SPIRITUALISM, MADAME BLAVATSKY, AND THEOSOPHY

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SPIRITUALISM, MADAME BLAVATSKY, AND THEOSOPHY.jpg

SPIRITUALISM, MADAME BLAVATSKY, AND THEOSOPHY

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Spiritualism, Madame Blavatsky & Theosophy

Without the spiritualist movement and the amazing personality of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, the creator of the Theosophical Society, the spiritual revolution of the twentieth century - the so-called New Age, with all its movers and shakers - would be unimaginable. And the work of Rudolf Steiner, G.I. Gurdjieff, Ren Gunon, Hazrat Inayat Khan, Sri Aurobindo, R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz, and C.G. Jung could not have become what it was. In this fascinating volume on the Theosophical movement, Rudolf Steiner, one of its primary participants, tells his story in his own words

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Spiritualism, Madame Blavatsky & Theosophy

Without the spiritualist movement and the amazing personality of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, the creator of the Theosophical Society, the spiritual revolution of the twentieth century - the so-called New Age, with all its movers and shakers - would be unimaginable. And the work of Rudolf Steiner, G.I. Gurdjieff, Ren Gunon, Hazrat Inayat Khan, Sri Aurobindo, R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz, and C.G. Jung could not have become what it was. In this fascinating volume on the Theosophical movement, Rudolf Steiner, one of its primary participants, tells his story in his own words. We are told of the origins of the theosophical movement in spiritualism and somnambulism. We are given Steiner's own version of the relationship between Anthroposophy and Theosophy through his White Lotus Day Lectures, given over several years on the anniversary of Madame Blavatsky's death. Steiner then moves into the realm of occult history, where he relates Theosophy to its historical ground in Western esotericism, especially Rosicrucianism. He reveals events from the seventeenth century that led to the emergence of Freemasonry and other secret societies, as well as the hidden history of the creation of Theosophy in the nineteenth century and the conflicts that still reverberate today between the Anglo-Saxon and Germanic occult streams. 26745 Now the time has actually arrived when we have a subconscious glimmering of the impossibility of the modern approach to nature and some sense that things have to change. -Rudolf Steiner Rudolf Steiners course on light, which includes explorations of color, sound, mass, electricity and magnetism, presages the dawn of a new world view in the natural sciences that will stand our notion of the physical world on its head. This first course in natural science, given to the teachers of the new Stuttgart Waldorf School as an inspiration for developing the physics curriculum, is based on Goethes phenomenological approach to the study of nature. Acknowledging that modern physicists had come to regard Goethes ideas on physics as a kind of nonsense, Steiner contrasts the traditional scientific approach, which treats phenomena as evidence of natural laws, with Goethean science, which rejects the idea of an abstract law behind natural phenomena and instead seeks to be a rational description of nature. Steiner then corrects the mechanistic reductionism practiced by scientific positivists, emphasizing instead the validity of human experience and pointing toward a revolution in scientific paradigms that would reclaim ground for the subject-the human being-in the study of nature.